WINTER INDUSTRIAL TRAINING PROGRAM

Learn the Best Technology from the BEST – Mr. Vimal Daga , Renowned Industry Expert – Cloud, BigData, DevOps, Linux & Python
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Programming with Python – Python is a popular high-level programming language. It is a general-purpose language used by scientists, developers, and many others who want to get things done quickly and effectively.
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Python is the most emerging technology that can boost up the career graph. You are at the right place to get right career support.

Schedule for Winter Training 2017 – 2018 : 9th Dec / 23rd Dec, 2017

Applications Open for BE / BTech Winter Training – http://www.lwindia.com/winter-training-application-form.php

Course Content – http://www.lwindia.com/linuxworldindia-winter-internship-industrial-training.php

Confused in choosing the right path or right technology feel free to Call us at +91 9829105960,0141-2501609

Email Id : hr@lwindia.com
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What is internship and during 4 years of B .tech when will I have to do the Winter internship?

Winter Internship also called as training, means to get in the industrial environment/get exposure of day to day industrial work and how it is carried out.

Why Winter Internship?

By doing this you will know yourself more clearly, where you stand the industrial needs and what changes you need in yourself. You will learn to work under mentors/seniors/managers. It will develop your tolerance power, patience, group work abilities, etc. It will be a whole new experience.

When to do Winter Internship?

You can do it whenever you want to, when you think you must have to do it. But Indian Govt. has made Internship compulsory before joining a company so you have to do it in your 5th/ 6th/ 7th/8th semester. If you are willing for an Winter Internship, the right time to do it starts when you’ve completed your 1st year else after completion of 2nd year (most suitable). If you go like doing internship after completion of 1st year, you can do 3-4 internships and that will be too much beneficial I think with almost every kind of experience.

General Trend – Most do it after completion of 3rd year or 7th/8th semester.

Answer for your ques ends here…

Few more things-

You must have a sound resume to go for an internship and very good knowledge of things you mentioned in your resume as you have to go through interviews.

Secondly, you can’t directly enter into any firm for Internship, either you need few references or have to wait for the firm’s ads for internship. However, chances are there that you can directly approach any local firm, showing them some of the stuffs you created (small scale stuffs like a small website, 2-3 web designs, any mobile app anything relevant to the training).Always keep in mind, whatever you learn, try to implement it in real life or create something using it.

If anyone want to Do winter internship on  New Technology like Hadoop, Cloud Computing, DevOps, Docker, Splunk, Linux and many more technology visit on – http://www.linuxworldindia.org/linuxworldindia-winter-internship-industrial-training.php


Winter Internship for B.tech Students

During the Winter Internship Program, you will get Practical Exposure on various real time case studies. We truly believe that Practical knowledge is more important than theoretical Concept that are the reason our labs our 24*7 Available.

At LinuxWorld Informatics Pvt ltd offering Practical Knowledge to students is our main Motto. All Internships are delivered by Expert Certified Trainers with Industrial Exposure.

internshipWhy LinuxWorld Winter Internship Program:

Winter Internship Program plays an important role in every student’s life and selected the best Internship company is one of the Major factors

Here are the 8 reasons you should LinuxWorld for Winter Internship

  1. Intensive Hands-on Practical Sessions.
  2. Certified Expert Trainers
  3. Authorized Internship Certificates.
  4. Project Letters.
  5. 24*7 Lab Access.
  6. Resume writing classes.
  7. Placement and career guidance.

Winter Internship Program Details:

  1. Distributed Computing using Big Data Hadoop Implementation over RedHat Linux Platform
  2. Cloud Computing Services with RedHat Linux Program
  3. OpenStack Cloud Computing Implementation Over RedHat Linux System Program
  4. Cloud Storage Implementation Over RedHat Linux System Program
  5. RedHat Linux System Administration and Engineer Program
  6. Cisco Network Administrator Program
  7. Cisco and RedHat Integrated System and Network Management Program

To more visit – http://www.linuxworldindia.org/linuxworldindia-winter-internship-industrial-training.php


3 key ways Hadoop is evolving

Hot themes at the Strata+Hadoop World conference reflect the shift for the big data platform

The Strata+Hadoop World 2015 conference in New York this week was subtitled “Make Data Work,” but given how Hadoop world’s has evolved over the past year (even over the past six months) another apt subtitle might have been “See Hadoop Change.”
bigdata hadoop winter Training at linuxworldThis guide, available in both PDF and ePub editions, explains the security capabilities inherent to
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Here are three of the most significant recent trends in Hadoop, as reflected by the show’s roster of breakout sessions, vendors, and technologies.

Spark is so hot it had its own schedule track, labeled “Spark and Beyond,” with sessions on everything from using the R language with Spark to running Spark on Mesos.

Some of the enthusiasm comes from Cloudera — a big fan of Spark — and its sponsorship for the show. But Spark’s rising popularity is hard to ignore.

Spark’s importance stems from how it offers self-service data processing, by way of a common API, no matter where that data is stored. (At least half of the work done with Spark isn’t within Hadoop.) Arsalan Tavakoli-Shiraji, vice president of customer engagement for Databricks, Spark’s chief commercial proponent, spoke of how those tasked with getting business value out of data “eagerly want data, whether they’re using SQL, R, or Python, but hate calling IT.”

Rob Thomas, IBM’s vice president of product development for IBM Analytics, cited Spark as a key in the shift away from “a world of infrastructure to a world of insight.” Hadoop data lakes often become dumping grounds, he claimed, without much business value that Spark can provide.

The pitch for Hadoop is no longer about it being a data repository — that’s a given — it’s about having skilled people and powerful tools to plug into it in order to get something useful out.

Two years ago, the keynote speeches at Strata+Hadoop were all about creating a single repository for enterprise data. This time around, the words “data lake” were barely mentioned in the keynotes — and only in a derogatory tone. Talk of “citizen data scientists,” “using big data for good,” and smart decision making with data was offered instead.

What happened to the old message? It was elbowed aside by the growing realization that the culture of self-service tools for data science on Hadoop offers more real value than the ability to aggregate data from multiple sources. If the old Hadoop world was about free-form data storage, the new Hadoop world is (ostensibly) about free-form data science.

The danger s making terms like “data scientist” too generic, in the same way that “machine learning” was watered down through overly broad use.

Hadoop is become a proving ground for new tech

Few would dispute that Hadoop remains important, least of all the big names behind the major distributions. But attention and excitement seem less focused on Hadoop as a whole than on the individual pieces emerging from Hadoop’s big tent — and are put to use creating entirely new products.

Spark is the obvious example, both for what it can do and how it goes about doing it. Spark’s latest incarnation features major workarounds for issues with the JVM’s garbage collection and memory management systems, technologies that have exciting implications outside of Spark.

But other new-tech-from-Hadoop examples are surfacing: Kafka, the Hadoop message-broker system for high-speed data streams, is at the heart of products like Mesosphere Infinity and Salesforce’s IoT Cloud. If a technology can survive deployment at scale within Hadoop, the conventional wisdom goes, it’s probably a good breakthrough.

Unfortunately, because Hadoop is such a fertile breeding ground, it’s also becoming more fragmented. Efforts to provide a firmer definition of what’s inside the Hadoop tent, like the Open Data Platform Initiative, have inspired as much dissent and division as agreement and consensus. And new additions to the Hadoop toolbox risk further complicating an already dense picture. Kudu, the new Hadoop file system championed by Cloudera as a way to combine the best of HDFS and HBase, isn’t compatible with HDFS’ protocols — yet.

There’s little sign that the mix of ingredients that make up Hadoop will become any less ad hoc or variegated with time, thanks to the slew of vendors vying to deliver their own spin on the platform. But whatever becomes of Hadoop, some of its pieces have already proven they can thrive on their own


How do enterprises really use Hadoop?

A panel session at Strata+Hadoop 2015 explores the ways enterprises are making the most of the big data platform

It’s easy to think most of the big, urgent questions around Hadoop are technical: What’s so special about Spark vs. MapReduce? What are the data governance tools like?

Linuxworld hadoop training

But judging from the turnout at a session at the Strata+Hadoop World 2015 conference in New York yesterday, the most urgent questions may be the simplest: What’s the best way to get started? How do you demonstrate to the rest of the company that Hadoop is worth the effort?

The session, entitled “Real data, real implementations: What actual customers are doing,” was chaired by Andrew Brust of Datameer and featured panelists from American Airlines, Kelley Blue Book, and American Express describing their companies’ real-world achievements with Hadoop and what it took to make them happen. Clearly the subject had draw: The audience packed the room, with some attendees lining up along the back wall or sitting on the floor.

Brust’s opened the panel with a question likely echoed by most enterprises users: How do we get started quickly in Hadoop?

American Express Publishing Corp.’s Kendell Timmers stressed not technology, but people — specifically, an “information buddy system.” Early adopters who wanted to work with Hadoop did all the original heavy lifting, figuring out how to get data into the system and what to download and work with. By the time a second wave of adopters had arrived, the first wave had already developed ways to support each other, such as creating a wiki or roster of “wizards,” people who would take an hour out to field one-on-one questions.

Which makes more sense, Datameer’s Brust asked: To hire outside Hadoop talent or train one’s own people? Jeff Jarrell, a data architect at American Airlines, noted that while his company does a lot of internal grooming, “a lot of people [from outside] do want to get into this space.” Many of the company’s outside hires are from universities with data science programs. “[From there] we get ‘adepts’ — first-year hires — who are motivated to use the tech.”

Timmers said American Express’s approach was to do both — get people from the outside who are a quick start and bring in new ideas, but also cultivate internal talent to leverage what they know about the business. “You already have a lot of valuable people who know about your data, and that’s extremely valuable and not replaceable,” he said.

This emphasis on the human element makes sense — a shortage in Hadoop skills is a big reason why many Hadoop deployments don’t provide the expected return on investments.

What about demonstrating proof of business value to the rest of the company? At American Express, Timmers said the proof came with a program that matched third-party offers to card members, using algorithms to determine the best matches. The original algorithm “took two and a half days to run” and produced poor matches; the new Hadoop-based match algorithm runs in “only four hours,” produced far better results, and ended up enjoying wide adoption.

Ryan Wright, a manager of data management at Kelley Blue Book, said his company developed an entirely new reporting environment for the marketing side of the business that allowed them to budget better. This example underscores that enabling self-service reporting with Hadoop is one of the most tangible ways to demonstrate its value.


Microsoft Enables Transparent Encryption on Azure SQL Cloud Databases

Azure SQL Cloud DatabaseThe company’s Transparent Data Encryption option, borrowed from SQL Server, is now generally available as part of numerous upgrades to its cloud database platform.
Microsoft’s cloud customers can now more easily encrypt their databases with this week’s release of the new Azure SQL Database Transparent Data Encryption (TDE) feature.TDE enables customers “to protect your data and help you meet compliance requirements by encrypting your database, associated backups, and transaction log files at rest without requiring changes to your application,” said Jack Richins, principal program manager of Microsoft Azure SQL Database, in an Oct. 14 announcement. TDE hails from the Transparent Data Feature used by Microsoft SQL Server since 2008, he revealed. In its cloud-based implementation, his group added support for Intel’s AES-NI (Advanced Encryption Standard New Instructions) hardware-based acceleration, reducing computational overhead and improving performance.TDE encrypts the entirety of a database’s storage using an AES-256 symmetric key, explained Richins. “SQL Database protects this database encryption key with a service-managed certificate,” he said. Certificates are automatically rotated at least every 90 days, according Microsoft’s online documentation.Switching the feature on can be accomplished with just a few clicks. “All key management for database copying, Geo-Replication, and database restores anywhere in SQL Database is handled by the service—just enable it on your database with two clicks on the Azure Preview Portal: click ON, then click Save, and you’re done,” Richins said.
The company is currently previewing SQL AlwaysOn integration with Azure Site Recovery (ASR), Microsoft’s cloud-based disaster recovery service. SQL AlwaysOn is a set of high availability and disaster recovery technologies found in Microsoft SQL Server.”SQL Availability Groups can now be added to ASR Recovery plans along with virtual machines,” stated Prateek Sharma, a Microsoft Cloud and Enterprise senior program manager, in a blog post. “All capabilities of ASR Recovery plans such as sequencing, scripting and manual actions can be leveraged to orchestrate the failover of a multi-tier application that uses a SQL database, configured with AlwaysOn replication, as backend.”The offering also helps streamline IT operations, by removing “the need to write and manage the scripts required for failover of SQL AlwaysOn Availability Groups. This solution is currently supported only for System Center Virtual Machine Manager managed environments,” noted Sharma.Finally, Microsoft has added cross-database query support to Azure SQL’s elastic database query feature, essentially allowing multiple databases to contribute rows into a single result.”This makes possible common cross-database querying tasks like selecting from a remote table into a local table,” noted Microsoft Principal Program Manager Lead Torsten Grabs in a statement. “It also allows for richer remote database querying topologies.”Customers can also now access the elastic database query feature in Azure SQL’s Standard performance tier, announced Grabs. “This significantly lowers the cost of entry for cross-database querying and partitioning scenarios in Azure SQL Database,” he said.Users may notice somewhat of a delay, warned Grabs. “Due to the smaller DTU [Database Transaction Unit] limits in the Standard tier, it can take up to one minute to initialize elastic database query when you run your first remote database query.” Microsoft is working on improving the feature’s initiation latency, he said.

Who Is Responsible for Security in the Cloud?

Security is a primary concern for most organizations looking at cloud adoption, but who is responsible for making sure the cloud is secure? That’s one of the many questions that a Ponemon Institute survey, sponsored by security hosting vendor Armor, asked.More than half (56 percent) of respondents said that the primary reason they adopt cloud is to reduce costs, while only 8 percent said that a primary reason is to improve security, according to the study, which is based on a poll of 990 senior IT professionals in the United States and United Kingdom. Meanwhile, 79 percent of respondents indicated that security is a critical part of the cloud migration decision.”It continues to surprise me that there seems to be agreement in the industry that security is important and continues to be a major concern in the cloud,” Jeff Schilling, CSO at Armor (previously known as Firehost), told eWEEK. “However, more than half of the respondents are unwilling to pay a premium to ensure the security of their sensitive data in the cloud.”Despite the views of the survey’s respondents, it is possible to achieve a secure posture in the cloud, said Schilling, who is a former director of the U.S. Army’s Global Network Operations and Security Center, which falls under the U.S. Army’s Cyber Command.

In Schilling’s view, the cloud is the place that allows enterprises to take back the initiative from the threat actors, but it takes the right technology, managed via the right techniques and the right people. “Not investing in the proper security controls gives threat actors the advantage,” he said.

The survey asked multiple questions about responsibilities for cloud software-as-as-service (SaaS) as well as infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) deployments. Only 15 percent of respondents indicated that IT security is most responsible for ensuring the security of SaaS applications, while 16 percent of respondents identified IT security as most responsible for the security of IaaS resources.”Security is something that is everyone’s responsibility to some degree, yet no one particular function seems to step up and own it,” Schilling said. “This is absolutely where managed security providers can come in to take on some responsibilities and share some of the risk.”Schilling suggests that customers considering a managed service should ensure that their chosen provider clearly delineates the responsibilities that they will assume versus those that the customer will retain.The study also asked respondents about deployments of IT security technologies on-premises and in the cloud; 59 percent of respondents indicated that they deploy security information and event management (SIEM) technology on premises, while 39 percent deploy it in the cloud.”Based on my past experiences, many companies keep SIEM on premises, whether due to regulatory requirements or just by the nature of the amount of data being processed and stored,” Schilling said. “That said, we find that SIEM can absolutely work in the cloud if you have the right architecture and talent to manage it.”When it comes to intrusion-prevention systems (IPS), 54 percent of respondents noted that they deploy in the cloud, with 42 percent reporting on-premise deployments. For next-generation firewalls (NGFWs), the results are flipped, with 38 percent deploying on premises and 17 percent deploying in the cloud.”For advanced firewalls or unified threat platforms [such as a firewall-IPS combo], there is a struggle to virtualize the software and move off of bare metal,” Schilling said. “Part of me suspects this is more of a business decision by most of the vendors, as software companies drive less revenue than hardware/software companies.”The industry is starting to see some of the big players move to the cloud because they realize they will be irrelevant if they don’t have a cloud option, Schilling explained.While one part of the study showed that respondents, in fact, use security applications in the cloud, 32 percent indicated that IT security applications are considered too risky to be processed or housed in the cloud.The back-end analytics systems for some of the largest security companies in the world require tremendous horizontal and vertical scaling as their business grows and the complexity of their analytics grow exponentially, Schilling said, adding that nearly all security vendors that approach him lately have some level of public cloud use as part of their enterprises.”I love asking them to present their security validation paperwork so I can get a sense of how they are securing their cloud use,” Schilling said. “Most of the time, the conversation turns to ‘thank you for your time and I will get back to you,’ and I never hear from them.”


Red Hat has become the leading vendor of OpenStack, but the company — and others — freely acknowledge serious issues related to complexity, scalability, and availability

OpenStack found its way into four of Red Hat’s top 30 deals last quarter, a quarter that saw the company pushing toward $2 billion in annual revenues — good for Red Hat, good for OpenStack.

Despite that rosy news, however, Red Hat’s earnings call highlighted several areas where OpenStack continues to fall short.
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OpenStack still has a long way to go

Take, for example, the OpenStack code base, which continues to be a cauldron of competing projects and a fair amount of poor-quality code.

This isn’t exactly news, given that early OpenStack leader Andrew Shafer once pilloried parts of the project as “a mishmash of naive ideas and pipe dreams.” More recently, OpenStack luminary Randy Bias has candidly derided the silos that different vendors impose on OpenStack, containing “special features that only you have.”

The result? “Every OpenStack deployment is its own unique snowflake,” Bias notes, due to the “hundreds upon hundreds of configuration options.”

Even Red Hat has gotten into the criticism game, with CEO Jim Whitehurst acknowledging OpenStack’s scalability issues on the Red Hat earnings call: “One of the issues … with OpenStack is its scalability, but it’s basically … assuming applications that are stateless,” leaving Red Hat needing to “continu[e] to build more high-availability features to allow it to run traditional applications.”

Despite such deficiencies, OpenStack’s complexity is like red meat for Red Hat, which thrives on taking complex infrastructure and making it easily consumable by mainstream enterprises. As former Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens told me in 2006, “Red Hat’s model works because of the complexity of the technology we work with. An operating platform has a lot of moving parts, and customers are willing to pay to be insulated from that complexity.”

While Bias may not like the vendor-imposed complexity, you won’t hear Red Hat complaining about it. In fact, Red Hat is counting on complexity all the way to the bank.
Enterprises still aren’t thinking about OpenStack correctly

However, OpenStack is still early days for Red Hat customers, Whitehurst revealed during the earnings call. The only ones embracing OpenStack are “earlier adopters,” he suggested, with OpenStack deals “lumpy,” meaning sporadic and large when they do close (due to professional services required to make it work).

Among those early adopters, Red Hat may have a problem. They may may not be ready for what OpenStack was designed: cloud-native applications. As Bias says:

There is no doubt that OpenStack was designed as an AWS clone — that is its lineage. OpenStack is for cloud-native applications… It’s not for running applications that require a 5-9’s infrastructure. [Those] don’t belong on OpenStack.

But Whitehurst, speaking on the Red Hat earnings call, gave a somewhat different view as to Red Hat’s customers and their intentions:

One of the issues or features with OpenStack is its scalability, but it’s basically … assuming applications that are stateless, and so continuing to build more high-availability features to allow it to run traditional applications is something we’ve been talking a lot to customers about.

[T]here’s a general belief that OpenStack is going to be a kind of low-cost platform of choice with customers going forward, but there’s a sense that, hey, Red Hat, you need to help us take some of our existing applications and migrate them onto OpenStack. So we’re actively working with some customers on that.

Such legacy applications aren’t likely to be a good fit for a cloud-native platform.

Of course, the kinds of early adopters interested in OpenStack also have big wallets. While Whitehurst didn’t go into detail, he did highlight the kinds of companies that currently are willing to put up with OpenStack’s rough edges and pay up for professional services to fill in the many blanks it leaves: one of the “very large global telcos” and “a very, very large financial service institution.”

In other words, unless you’re big with serious technology chops, you’re probably not safe going into the OpenStack water. Otherwise, be prepared to pay equally big professional services fees.

But wait! There’s more.
Docker is a much bigger deal than OpenStack

As big as the community behind OpenStack has been, Whitehurst declared Docker the “single biggest topic that comes up among … [Red Hat’s] leading [customers].” In fact, Whitehurst noted that he hears more from customers about Docker than OpenStack.

I’ve argued before that Red Hat should forget OpenStack and double-down on Docker. Listening to the earnings call, this argument gains even more force. Whitehurst talked about why Docker containers are such a big deal. It’s “not because the infrastructure people necessarily want [Docker],” he said, “but [because] developers are picking it up because it’s so much more productive for developers.”

OpenStack is a vendor response to Amazon Web Services — and a half-baked one. Containers, by contrast, immediately make developers’ lives easier (just as AWS does), so they’re being adopted in droves. Developers aren’t asking for OpenStack, and it’s the developer that Red Hat must satisfy.

Let’s review: According to the leading vendor of OpenStack, the technology isn’t mature and as a result is expensive to implement successfully. Enterprises continue looking to OpenStack to solve problems its ill-equipped to solve — and Docker attracts vastly more interest because it meets real developer needs.

Why continue to pour resources into OpenStack?


5 Ways to Keep Your Information Secure in the Cloud

In 2011, hacking groups like Lulzsec and Anonymous provoked an Internet firestorm by hacking major Web sites like Fox.com and online services like Sony’s PlayStation Network. Millions of user accounts were compromised. Usernames, passwords, home addresses and credit card information — lax Web site security often allows hackers easy access to boatloads of personal information. We can blame corporations for poor security and hackers for maliciously attacking Web sites, but there’s a third party often at fault in these attacks: ourselves, the users.

No, it’s not our fault Web sites get hacked. But poor Web safety habits put us at risk when we shouldn’t be. How often do you use the same username and password? Every time you create a new profile? If someone hacked your Facebook account, could they just as easily get into your e-mail inbox? Reusing passwords — or using weak passwords — makes you an easy target for identity theft. Remembering multiple passwords can be a pain, but there are Web services that can help. We’ll talk about one of the most popular options later in this article.

Internet cloud services — services that store your data on a server rather than on your hard drive so you can access it from any Internet-enabled device — are more powerful than ever before. Backing up photographs and important documents has never been easier. Google Docs and Gmail can take the place of Microsoft Word and Outlook Express. Banking sites take the place of expensive finance applications. All we have to do is be safe while we use them. Here are some simple safety tips for keeping your data secure in the cloud. First up: making your passwords as tough to crack as Fort Knox.

Play Smart with Passwords

|
The beauty of cloud computing lies in the easy access you have to your data using any Internet-connected device. But without proper security precautions, you could be leaving yourself open to trouble.

Computer Image Gallery

The beauty of cloud computing lies in the easy access you have to your data using any Internet-connected device. But without proper security precautions, you could be leaving yourself open to trouble.

©iStockphoto.com/Thinkstock

In 2011, hacking groups like Lulzsec and Anonymous provoked an Internet firestorm by hacking major Web sites like Fox.com and online services like Sony’s PlayStation Network. Millions of user accounts were compromised. Usernames, passwords, home addresses and credit card information — lax Web site security often allows hackers easy access to boatloads of personal information. We can blame corporations for poor security and hackers for maliciously attacking Web sites, but there’s a third party often at fault in these attacks: ourselves, the users.

No, it’s not our fault Web sites get hacked. But poor Web safety habits put us at risk when we shouldn’t be. How often do you use the same username and password? Every time you create a new profile? If someone hacked your Facebook account, could they just as easily get into your e-mail inbox? Reusing passwords — or using weak passwords — makes you an easy target for identity theft. Remembering multiple passwords can be a pain, but there are Web services that can help. We’ll talk about one of the most popular options later in this article.

Internet cloud services — services that store your data on a server rather than on your hard drive so you can access it from any Internet-enabled device — are more powerful than ever before. Backing up photographs and important documents has never been easier. Google Docs and Gmail can take the place of Microsoft Word and Outlook Express. Banking sites take the place of expensive finance applications. All we have to do is be safe while we use them. Here are some simple safety tips for keeping your data secure in the cloud. First up: making your passwords as tough to crack as Fort Knox.

Is your password something that could be easily guessed, like a pet's name or -- heaven forbid -- the word "password"? If so, change it immediately.

Is your password something that could be easily guessed, like a pet’s name or — heaven forbid — the word “password”? If so, change it immediately.

Hemera/Thinkstock

Passwords are designed to keep our information safe from prying eyes. They’re like locks. A hacker may force the door and break your lock, but most of the time a strong lock keeps people out. But let’s be honest: Passwords are annoying. Remembering them is a pain, so we often take the easy way out and use simple passwords that we won’t forget. But if they’re easy to remember, they’re also easy to guess.

When the site RockYou.com was hacked in 2009, a security firm examined the 32 million compromised passwords and found that thousands upon thousands of users relied on the same basic phrases. The password “123456” took first place with 290,731 hits; “12345,” “123456789,” “Password” and “iloveyou” rounded out the top five most-used passwords [source: Tom’sHardware]. If you use one of those passwords, change it. The more complicated your password is, the safer your data will be. It’s true, complex passwords won’t be as easy to recall. Find a safe place to record your passwords if you can’t remember them.

The best passwords combine letters, numbers and symbols into an unusual configuration. Don’t take the easy route and capitalize the first letter of the word or use the numeral “1” in place of the letter “l” or a zero in place of the letter “O.” Throw in a few random numbers or characters like a plus sign (+) or underscore (_) and you’ll be far better off than anyone relying on “password123” or “qwerty” to keep them safe. Once you have a good password, what you do next is just as important: Don’t spread it around.

Don’t Reuse or Share Passwords

|
The beauty of cloud computing lies in the easy access you have to your data using any Internet-connected device. But without proper security precautions, you could be leaving yourself open to trouble.

Computer Image Gallery

The beauty of cloud computing lies in the easy access you have to your data using any Internet-connected device. But without proper security precautions, you could be leaving yourself open to trouble.

©iStockphoto.com/Thinkstock

In 2011, hacking groups like Lulzsec and Anonymous provoked an Internet firestorm by hacking major Web sites like Fox.com and online services like Sony’s PlayStation Network. Millions of user accounts were compromised. Usernames, passwords, home addresses and credit card information — lax Web site security often allows hackers easy access to boatloads of personal information. We can blame corporations for poor security and hackers for maliciously attacking Web sites, but there’s a third party often at fault in these attacks: ourselves, the users.

No, it’s not our fault Web sites get hacked. But poor Web safety habits put us at risk when we shouldn’t be. How often do you use the same username and password? Every time you create a new profile? If someone hacked your Facebook account, could they just as easily get into your e-mail inbox? Reusing passwords — or using weak passwords — makes you an easy target for identity theft. Remembering multiple passwords can be a pain, but there are Web services that can help. We’ll talk about one of the most popular options later in this article.

Internet cloud services — services that store your data on a server rather than on your hard drive so you can access it from any Internet-enabled device — are more powerful than ever before. Backing up photographs and important documents has never been easier. Google Docs and Gmail can take the place of Microsoft Word and Outlook Express. Banking sites take the place of expensive finance applications. All we have to do is be safe while we use them. Here are some simple safety tips for keeping your data secure in the cloud. First up: making your passwords as tough to crack as Fort Knox.

Is your password something that could be easily guessed, like a pet's name or -- heaven forbid -- the word "password"? If so, change it immediately.

Is your password something that could be easily guessed, like a pet’s name or — heaven forbid — the word “password”? If so, change it immediately.

Hemera/Thinkstock

Passwords are designed to keep our information safe from prying eyes. They’re like locks. A hacker may force the door and break your lock, but most of the time a strong lock keeps people out. But let’s be honest: Passwords are annoying. Remembering them is a pain, so we often take the easy way out and use simple passwords that we won’t forget. But if they’re easy to remember, they’re also easy to guess.

When the site RockYou.com was hacked in 2009, a security firm examined the 32 million compromised passwords and found that thousands upon thousands of users relied on the same basic phrases. The password “123456” took first place with 290,731 hits; “12345,” “123456789,” “Password” and “iloveyou” rounded out the top five most-used passwords [source: Tom’sHardware]. If you use one of those passwords, change it. The more complicated your password is, the safer your data will be. It’s true, complex passwords won’t be as easy to recall. Find a safe place to record your passwords if you can’t remember them.

The best passwords combine letters, numbers and symbols into an unusual configuration. Don’t take the easy route and capitalize the first letter of the word or use the numeral “1” in place of the letter “l” or a zero in place of the letter “O.” Throw in a few random numbers or characters like a plus sign (+) or underscore (_) and you’ll be far better off than anyone relying on “password123” or “qwerty” to keep them safe. Once you have a good password, what you do next is just as important: Don’t spread it around.

Don’t Reuse or Share Passwords

The annoyance of remembering passwords strikes again. It’s bad enough that we tend to use simple, easy-to-remember passwords for our Web logins — we also tend to pick one or two passwords and use them again and again for our e-mail, banking, Facebook and everything else. That’s bad. In fact, that’s really bad. If your password is compromised, someone could easily gain access to your e-mail account. And change that password. And then go to every site you’re registered on and change those passwords — the replacement passwords are always sent to your e-mail address.

Use different passwords for different sites. At the very least, change up letters, symbols and capitalization if you plan to use the same word or phrase across multiple sites. Make absolutely sure you don’t repeat a password across sites that have your credit card information or social security number. Your e-mail password is the most important. Keep it secure and don’t use it for any other sites.

One last password tip: Don’t tell other people your passwords. Even if you trust them, it’s not a particularly good idea. The more people who know your passwords, the greater the chances that those passwords could be accidentally compromised. All these password rules make our online lives more secure, but they don’t make them easier. Next up: a tool for taking some of the inconvenience out of password management.

Manage Passwords with LastPass

Manage Passwords with LastPass

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The beauty of cloud computing lies in the easy access you have to your data using any Internet-connected device. But without proper security precautions, you could be leaving yourself open to trouble.

Computer Image Gallery

The beauty of cloud computing lies in the easy access you have to your data using any Internet-connected device. But without proper security precautions, you could be leaving yourself open to trouble.

©iStockphoto.com/Thinkstock

In 2011, hacking groups like Lulzsec and Anonymous provoked an Internet firestorm by hacking major Web sites like Fox.com and online services like Sony’s PlayStation Network. Millions of user accounts were compromised. Usernames, passwords, home addresses and credit card information — lax Web site security often allows hackers easy access to boatloads of personal information. We can blame corporations for poor security and hackers for maliciously attacking Web sites, but there’s a third party often at fault in these attacks: ourselves, the users.

No, it’s not our fault Web sites get hacked. But poor Web safety habits put us at risk when we shouldn’t be. How often do you use the same username and password? Every time you create a new profile? If someone hacked your Facebook account, could they just as easily get into your e-mail inbox? Reusing passwords — or using weak passwords — makes you an easy target for identity theft. Remembering multiple passwords can be a pain, but there are Web services that can help. We’ll talk about one of the most popular options later in this article.

Internet cloud services — services that store your data on a server rather than on your hard drive so you can access it from any Internet-enabled device — are more powerful than ever before. Backing up photographs and important documents has never been easier. Google Docs and Gmail can take the place of Microsoft Word and Outlook Express. Banking sites take the place of expensive finance applications. All we have to do is be safe while we use them. Here are some simple safety tips for keeping your data secure in the cloud. First up: making your passwords as tough to crack as Fort Knox.

Is your password something that could be easily guessed, like a pet's name or -- heaven forbid -- the word "password"? If so, change it immediately.

Is your password something that could be easily guessed, like a pet’s name or — heaven forbid — the word “password”? If so, change it immediately.

Hemera/Thinkstock

Passwords are designed to keep our information safe from prying eyes. They’re like locks. A hacker may force the door and break your lock, but most of the time a strong lock keeps people out. But let’s be honest: Passwords are annoying. Remembering them is a pain, so we often take the easy way out and use simple passwords that we won’t forget. But if they’re easy to remember, they’re also easy to guess.

When the site RockYou.com was hacked in 2009, a security firm examined the 32 million compromised passwords and found that thousands upon thousands of users relied on the same basic phrases. The password “123456” took first place with 290,731 hits; “12345,” “123456789,” “Password” and “iloveyou” rounded out the top five most-used passwords [source: Tom’sHardware]. If you use one of those passwords, change it. The more complicated your password is, the safer your data will be. It’s true, complex passwords won’t be as easy to recall. Find a safe place to record your passwords if you can’t remember them.

The best passwords combine letters, numbers and symbols into an unusual configuration. Don’t take the easy route and capitalize the first letter of the word or use the numeral “1” in place of the letter “l” or a zero in place of the letter “O.” Throw in a few random numbers or characters like a plus sign (+) or underscore (_) and you’ll be far better off than anyone relying on “password123” or “qwerty” to keep them safe. Once you have a good password, what you do next is just as important: Don’t spread it around.

The annoyance of remembering passwords strikes again. It’s bad enough that we tend to use simple, easy-to-remember passwords for our Web logins — we also tend to pick one or two passwords and use them again and again for our e-mail, banking, Facebook and everything else. That’s bad. In fact, that’s really bad. If your password is compromised, someone could easily gain access to your e-mail account. And change that password. And then go to every site you’re registered on and change those passwords — the replacement passwords are always sent to your e-mail address.

Use different passwords for different sites. At the very least, change up letters, symbols and capitalization if you plan to use the same word or phrase across multiple sites. Make absolutely sure you don’t repeat a password across sites that have your credit card information or social security number. Your e-mail password is the most important. Keep it secure and don’t use it for any other sites.

One last password tip: Don’t tell other people your passwords. Even if you trust them, it’s not a particularly good idea. The more people who know your passwords, the greater the chances that those passwords could be accidentally compromised. All these password rules make our online lives more secure, but they don’t make them easier. Next up: a tool for taking some of the inconvenience out of password management.

If you wish you only needed one password for all of your cloud computing needs, a password management tool like LastPass can help.

If you wish you only needed one password for all of your cloud computing needs, a password management tool like LastPass can help.

LastPass is a password management utility that locks all of your unique passwords behind one master password. That means you can create separate logins for e-mail, Facebook, Twitter, cloud storage and everything else you do online, but still access those accounts by memorizing one single password. Web browsers will remember passwords for you, but LastPass can synchronize your information across multiple browsers and devices and fill in forms with a single click.

LastPass will even help you create randomized passwords that no one will ever crack. The service is free, but for a $1 per month premium account you gain access to the mobile version of LastPass for iOS, Android and most other mobile operating systems. What if LastPass gets hacked? That’s possible, but LastPasshasprotocolsinplace to encourage users to change their master passwords in the event of a breach. More importantly, validation tools like IP and e-mail address verification make it difficult for an impostor to log in to your LastPass account.

LastPass is just one example of a cloud-based service that makes managing data on the Web easier. When it comes to preserving your important pictures and files, finding the right backup services is key.

Back Up Your Data|

The beauty of cloud computing lies in the easy access you have to your data using any Internet-connected device. But without proper security precautions, you could be leaving yourself open to trouble.

Computer Image Gallery

The beauty of cloud computing lies in the easy access you have to your data using any Internet-connected device. But without proper security precautions, you could be leaving yourself open to trouble.

©iStockphoto.com/Thinkstock

In 2011, hacking groups like Lulzsec and Anonymous provoked an Internet firestorm by hacking major Web sites like Fox.com and online services like Sony’s PlayStation Network. Millions of user accounts were compromised. Usernames, passwords, home addresses and credit card information — lax Web site security often allows hackers easy access to boatloads of personal information. We can blame corporations for poor security and hackers for maliciously attacking Web sites, but there’s a third party often at fault in these attacks: ourselves, the users.

No, it’s not our fault Web sites get hacked. But poor Web safety habits put us at risk when we shouldn’t be. How often do you use the same username and password? Every time you create a new profile? If someone hacked your Facebook account, could they just as easily get into your e-mail inbox? Reusing passwords — or using weak passwords — makes you an easy target for identity theft. Remembering multiple passwords can be a pain, but there are Web services that can help. We’ll talk about one of the most popular options later in this article.

Internet cloud services — services that store your data on a server rather than on your hard drive so you can access it from any Internet-enabled device — are more powerful than ever before. Backing up photographs and important documents has never been easier. Google Docs and Gmail can take the place of Microsoft Word and Outlook Express. Banking sites take the place of expensive finance applications. All we have to do is be safe while we use them. Here are some simple safety tips for keeping your data secure in the cloud. First up: making your passwords as tough to crack as Fort Knox.

Is your password something that could be easily guessed, like a pet's name or -- heaven forbid -- the word "password"? If so, change it immediately.

Is your password something that could be easily guessed, like a pet’s name or — heaven forbid — the word “password”? If so, change it immediately.

Hemera/Thinkstock

Passwords are designed to keep our information safe from prying eyes. They’re like locks. A hacker may force the door and break your lock, but most of the time a strong lock keeps people out. But let’s be honest: Passwords are annoying. Remembering them is a pain, so we often take the easy way out and use simple passwords that we won’t forget. But if they’re easy to remember, they’re also easy to guess.

When the site RockYou.com was hacked in 2009, a security firm examined the 32 million compromised passwords and found that thousands upon thousands of users relied on the same basic phrases. The password “123456” took first place with 290,731 hits; “12345,” “123456789,” “Password” and “iloveyou” rounded out the top five most-used passwords [source: Tom’sHardware]. If you use one of those passwords, change it. The more complicated your password is, the safer your data will be. It’s true, complex passwords won’t be as easy to recall. Find a safe place to record your passwords if you can’t remember them.

The best passwords combine letters, numbers and symbols into an unusual configuration. Don’t take the easy route and capitalize the first letter of the word or use the numeral “1” in place of the letter “l” or a zero in place of the letter “O.” Throw in a few random numbers or characters like a plus sign (+) or underscore (_) and you’ll be far better off than anyone relying on “password123” or “qwerty” to keep them safe. Once you have a good password, what you do next is just as important: Don’t spread it around.

The annoyance of remembering passwords strikes again. It’s bad enough that we tend to use simple, easy-to-remember passwords for our Web logins — we also tend to pick one or two passwords and use them again and again for our e-mail, banking, Facebook and everything else. That’s bad. In fact, that’s really bad. If your password is compromised, someone could easily gain access to your e-mail account. And change that password. And then go to every site you’re registered on and change those passwords — the replacement passwords are always sent to your e-mail address.

Use different passwords for different sites. At the very least, change up letters, symbols and capitalization if you plan to use the same word or phrase across multiple sites. Make absolutely sure you don’t repeat a password across sites that have your credit card information or social security number. Your e-mail password is the most important. Keep it secure and don’t use it for any other sites.

One last password tip: Don’t tell other people your passwords. Even if you trust them, it’s not a particularly good idea. The more people who know your passwords, the greater the chances that those passwords could be accidentally compromised. All these password rules make our online lives more secure, but they don’t make them easier. Next up: a tool for taking some of the inconvenience out of password management.

If you wish you only needed one password for all of your cloud computing needs, a password management tool like LastPass can help.

If you wish you only needed one password for all of your cloud computing needs, a password management tool like LastPass can help.

©iStockphoto.com/pagadesign

LastPass is a password management utility that locks all of your unique passwords behind one master password. That means you can create separate logins for e-mail, Facebook, Twitter, cloud storage and everything else you do online, but still access those accounts by memorizing one single password. Web browsers will remember passwords for you, but LastPass can synchronize your information across multiple browsers and devices and fill in forms with a single click.

LastPass will even help you create randomized passwords that no one will ever crack. The service is free, but for a $1 per month premium account you gain access to the mobile version of LastPass for iOS, Android and most other mobile operating systems. What if LastPass gets hacked? That’s possible, but LastPasshasprotocolsinplace to encourage users to change their master passwords in the event of a breach. More importantly, validation tools like IP and e-mail address verification make it difficult for an impostor to log in to your LastPass account.

LastPass is just one example of a cloud-based service that makes managing data on the Web easier. When it comes to preserving your important pictures and files, finding the right backup services is key.

If there’s one piece of advice the tech savvy have been espousing for years and years, it’s this: Back up your data. A power surge, faulty hard drive platter, robbery or other unexpected system failure could happen when you least expect it, and if your data isn’t backed up you’ll beat yourself up over it for weeks. Years ago, backing up data was an arduous task. Hard drive storage was costly, but floppy disks only held a paltry amount of data. Eventually, ZIP disks and CD burners offered enough space to facilitate backups, and DVDs and cheap hard drives made them easier still. But now we have something even better: the cloud.

Cloud storage solutions come in all shapes and sizes. Dropbox offers only a couple gigabytes of free storage, but its interface is incredibly simple to use. It creates a folder on your hard drive that’s linked to the Web — all you have to do to upload files is drag them into the folder. WindowsLiveSkydrive is designed to make it easy to view and edit Office documents in the cloud. Amazon’s Cloud Drive offers 5 gigabytes of free storage and a Web interface for uploading your files. Other services, like SugarSync and Mozy, focus more on automatically backing up your important data and storing it, rather than making it easily accessible online.

Here’s the smartest way to backup your data: Don’t rely on one service. Store files you access frequently in Dropbox and back up more in a free service like Amazon Cloud Drive. Keep a local backup on a secondary hard drive or on an automated backup drive like Apple’sTimeCapsule. With your data securely backed up and your passwords uncrackable, there’s only one thing left to be concerned about: your browsing habits

Back Up Your Data

your unique passwords behind one master password. That means you can create separate logins for e-mail, Facebook, Twitter, cloud storage and everything else you do online, but still access those accounts by memorizing one single password. Web browsers will remember passwords for you, but LastPass can synchronize your information across multiple browsers and devices and fill in forms with a single click.

LastPass will even help you create randomized passwords that no one will ever crack. The service is free, but for a $1 per month premium account you gain access to the mobile version of LastPass for iOS, Android and most other mobile operating systems. What if LastPass gets hacked? That’s possible, but LastPasshasprotocolsinplace to encourage users to change their master passwords in the event of a breach. More importantly, validation tools like IP and e-mail address verification make it difficult for an impostor to log in to your LastPass account.

LastPass is just one example of a cloud-based service that makes managing data on the Web easier. When it comes to preserving your important pictures and files, finding the right backup services is key.

If there’s one piece of advice the tech savvy have been espousing for years and years, it’s this: Back up your data. A power surge, faulty hard drive platter, robbery or other unexpected system failure could happen when you least expect it, and if your data isn’t backed up you’ll beat yourself up over it for weeks. Years ago, backing up data was an arduous task. Hard drive storage was costly, but floppy disks only held a paltry amount of data. Eventually, ZIP disks and CD burners offered enough space to facilitate backups, and DVDs and cheap hard drives made them easier still. But now we have something even better: the cloud.

Cloud storage solutions come in all shapes and sizes. Dropbox offers only a couple gigabytes of free storage, but its interface is incredibly simple to use. It creates a folder on your hard drive that’s linked to the Web — all you have to do to upload files is drag them into the folder. WindowsLiveSkydrive is designed to make it easy to view and edit Office documents in the cloud. Amazon’s Cloud Drive offers 5 gigabytes of free storage and a Web interface for uploading your files. Other services, like SugarSync and Mozy, focus more on automatically backing up your important data and storing it, rather than making it easily accessible online.

Here’s the smartest way to backup your data: Don’t rely on one service. Store files you access frequently in Dropbox and back up more in a free service like Amazon Cloud Drive. Keep a local backup on a secondary hard drive or on an automated backup drive like Apple’sTimeCapsule. With your data securely backed up and your passwords uncrackable, there’s only one thing left to be concerned about: your browsing habits.

Be Alert and Play It Safe

The beauty of cloud computing lies in the easy access you have to your data using any Internet-connected device. But without proper security precautions, you could be leaving yourself open to trouble.

Computer Image Gallery

The beauty of cloud computing lies in the easy access you have to your data using any Internet-connected device. But without proper security precautions, you could be leaving yourself open to trouble.

©iStockphoto.com/Thinkstock

In 2011, hacking groups like Lulzsec and Anonymous provoked an Internet firestorm by hacking major Web sites like Fox.com and online services like Sony’s PlayStation Network. Millions of user accounts were compromised. Usernames, passwords, home addresses and credit card information — lax Web site security often allows hackers easy access to boatloads of personal information. We can blame corporations for poor security and hackers for maliciously attacking Web sites, but there’s a third party often at fault in these attacks: ourselves, the users.

No, it’s not our fault Web sites get hacked. But poor Web safety habits put us at risk when we shouldn’t be. How often do you use the same username and password? Every time you create a new profile? If someone hacked your Facebook account, could they just as easily get into your e-mail inbox? Reusing passwords — or using weak passwords — makes you an easy target for identity theft. Remembering multiple passwords can be a pain, but there are Web services that can help. We’ll talk about one of the most popular options later in this article.

Internet cloud services — services that store your data on a server rather than on your hard drive so you can access it from any Internet-enabled device — are more powerful than ever before. Backing up photographs and important documents has never been easier. Google Docs and Gmail can take the place of Microsoft Word and Outlook Express. Banking sites take the place of expensive finance applications. All we have to do is be safe while we use them. Here are some simple safety tips for keeping your data secure in the cloud. First up: making your passwords as tough to crack as Fort Knox.

Is your password something that could be easily guessed, like a pet's name or -- heaven forbid -- the word "password"? If so, change it immediately.

Is your password something that could be easily guessed, like a pet’s name or — heaven forbid — the word “password”? If so, change it immediately.

Hemera/Thinkstock

Passwords are designed to keep our information safe from prying eyes. They’re like locks. A hacker may force the door and break your lock, but most of the time a strong lock keeps people out. But let’s be honest: Passwords are annoying. Remembering them is a pain, so we often take the easy way out and use simple passwords that we won’t forget. But if they’re easy to remember, they’re also easy to guess.

When the site RockYou.com was hacked in 2009, a security firm examined the 32 million compromised passwords and found that thousands upon thousands of users relied on the same basic phrases. The password “123456” took first place with 290,731 hits; “12345,” “123456789,” “Password” and “iloveyou” rounded out the top five most-used passwords [source: Tom’sHardware]. If you use one of those passwords, change it. The more complicated your password is, the safer your data will be. It’s true, complex passwords won’t be as easy to recall. Find a safe place to record your passwords if you can’t remember them.

The best passwords combine letters, numbers and symbols into an unusual configuration. Don’t take the easy route and capitalize the first letter of the word or use the numeral “1” in place of the letter “l” or a zero in place of the letter “O.” Throw in a few random numbers or characters like a plus sign (+) or underscore (_) and you’ll be far better off than anyone relying on “password123” or “qwerty” to keep them safe. Once you have a good password, what you do next is just as important: Don’t spread it around.

The annoyance of remembering passwords strikes again. It’s bad enough that we tend to use simple, easy-to-remember passwords for our Web logins — we also tend to pick one or two passwords and use them again and again for our e-mail, banking, Facebook and everything else. That’s bad. In fact, that’s really bad. If your password is compromised, someone could easily gain access to your e-mail account. And change that password. And then go to every site you’re registered on and change those passwords — the replacement passwords are always sent to your e-mail address.

Use different passwords for different sites. At the very least, change up letters, symbols and capitalization if you plan to use the same word or phrase across multiple sites. Make absolutely sure you don’t repeat a password across sites that have your credit card information or social security number. Your e-mail password is the most important. Keep it secure and don’t use it for any other sites.

One last password tip: Don’t tell other people your passwords. Even if you trust them, it’s not a particularly good idea. The more people who know your passwords, the greater the chances that those passwords could be accidentally compromised. All these password rules make our online lives more secure, but they don’t make them easier. Next up: a tool for taking some of the inconvenience out of password management.

If you wish you only needed one password for all of your cloud computing needs, a password management tool like LastPass can help.

If you wish you only needed one password for all of your cloud computing needs, a password management tool like LastPass can help.

©iStockphoto.com/pagadesign

LastPass is a password management utility that locks all of your unique passwords behind one master password. That means you can create separate logins for e-mail, Facebook, Twitter, cloud storage and everything else you do online, but still access those accounts by memorizing one single password. Web browsers will remember passwords for you, but LastPass can synchronize your information across multiple browsers and devices and fill in forms with a single click.

LastPass will even help you create randomized passwords that no one will ever crack. The service is free, but for a $1 per month premium account you gain access to the mobile version of LastPass for iOS, Android and most other mobile operating systems. What if LastPass gets hacked? That’s possible, but LastPasshasprotocolsinplace to encourage users to change their master passwords in the event of a breach. More importantly, validation tools like IP and e-mail address verification make it difficult for an impostor to log in to your LastPass account.

LastPass is just one example of a cloud-based service that makes managing data on the Web easier. When it comes to preserving your important pictures and files, finding the right backup services is key.

If there’s one piece of advice the tech savvy have been espousing for years and years, it’s this: Back up your data. A power surge, faulty hard drive platter, robbery or other unexpected system failure could happen when you least expect it, and if your data isn’t backed up you’ll beat yourself up over it for weeks. Years ago, backing up data was an arduous task. Hard drive storage was costly, but floppy disks only held a paltry amount of data. Eventually, ZIP disks and CD burners offered enough space to facilitate backups, and DVDs and cheap hard drives made them easier still. But now we have something even better: the cloud.

Cloud storage solutions come in all shapes and sizes. Dropbox offers only a couple gigabytes of free storage, but its interface is incredibly simple to use. It creates a folder on your hard drive that’s linked to the Web — all you have to do to upload files is drag them into the folder. WindowsLiveSkydrive is designed to make it easy to view and edit Office documents in the cloud. Amazon’s Cloud Drive offers 5 gigabytes of free storage and a Web interface for uploading your files. Other services, like SugarSync and Mozy, focus more on automatically backing up your important data and storing it, rather than making it easily accessible online.

Here’s the smartest way to backup your data: Don’t rely on one service. Store files you access frequently in Dropbox and back up more in a free service like Amazon Cloud Drive. Keep a local backup on a secondary hard drive or on an automated backup drive like Apple’sTimeCapsule. With your data securely backed up and your passwords uncrackable, there’s only one thing left to be concerned about: your browsing habits.

Internet hazards like viruses are, for the most part, easy to avoid. Shady Web sites usually look shady; e-mail attachments from spam addresses are never worth opening. Antivirus software is always a smart precaution, but smart browsing is an even greater ally. What does this have to do with protecting your data in the cloud? The same rules apply when it comes to buying online or creating accounts on new Web sites: Make sure the site is trustworthy.

If you’re buying from a retailer you’ve never heard of, do a little research on them first. They could have notoriously lax security and have a history of losing customer credit card information to hacking breaches.

Finally, be aware of what computers you’re logged into. Browsers will often ask to save your login information and keep a login session alive as long as the browser is open. If you log in to Facebook or your e-mail account on a friend’s laptop and then leave, you’ll likely still be logged in to those sites. If they’re trustworthy, that may not be a problem. But what if you’re using a public computer? Stay logged in to one of those and anyone could gain access to your account. Yep, that would be bad. Unless you’re using your own computer, remember to log out and never save your password and user information. Browse safe, and with a little luck, you’ll never have to worry about anyone finding a single one of your online passwords.


VMware Integrated OpenStack plays to VMware user base

One year ago VMware announced VMware Integrated OpenStack (VIO), designed to use OpenStack to bolster VMware — and vice versa. Now VIO 2.0 has arrived, with the same mission: It lets users with VMware expertise and product licensing leverage OpenStack without undue distraction or pain.

Ease of use and deployment are selling points for most commercial OpenStack products, but VMware continues to make a case that its product line — and customer openstack1

VIO 2.0 uses the OpenStack Kilo release, released earlier this year, as its foundation and adds support for Ceilometer (OpenStack’s telemetry component), autoscaling via the Heat orchestration system, load balancing as a service (LBaaS), and a host of other under-the-hood changes.

For OpenStack admins, the biggest change is VMware’s self-proclaimed seamless upgrade system. Upgrading an OpenStack installation has long been cited as a pain point, although some issues have been resolved incrementally over time (albeit more for individual components than for OpenStack as a whole).

VMware is determined not to let installation be a sticking point for its customers and promises the ability to roll back installs if anything goes awry, as well as back up and restore for OpenStack’s entire services and configuration set.
Keep your customers close(r)

With VIO, VMware never set out to capture an entirely new audience for OpenStack. Rather, VMware wants to protect itself from attrition since OpenStack has long been seen as a cheap way to get the majority of VMware’s functionality. If a chunk of VMware’s audience — present and future — eyes OpenStack as an escape hatch, it makes sense to give them an incentive to remain where they are or opt for VMware in the first round.

Boris Renski, co-founder of the OpenStack distribution Mirantis, has gone so far as to wager that VMware may draw more users for OpenStack than Red Hat. But he also seems aware that will most likely come through the existing VMware user base.

“Their sophisticated customer base wants to get more value out of their investments in VMware while also wanting the flexibility of working with alternative open source cloud solutions like OpenStack,” Renski told Matt Asay late last year.

VMware’s experiment with OpenStack as a value-add has plenty of room for growth. Some new features — load balancing, for instance — seem designed to appeal to users who want to build modern microservice-based architectures with OpenStack as a management framework, but also want to keep one foot in legacy VMs (which Charles Babcock of InformationWeek cited as a possibility).

But keeping VMware’s existing customer base happy, while letting them indulge in OpenStack without wandering off, remains the main mission.